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I'm reading a book which is about women's behavior when they love someone. The book has a paragraph:

Finally, try to appreciate women’s feminine communication style rather than let it get on your nerves. While women take less responsibility in the form of initiatives during dating, once the sexual relationship has officially been formed, they might change completely, to the extreme extent of bombarding you with text messages and phone calls. They do this because they are thinking of you, which is flattering. So you should interpret it as such rather than get annoyed by it. Females do not call their males every day at work and ask them what they are doing because they do not understand that their partners are working yet another day. Read between the lines and appreciate that she is showing that she cares about you in her feminine manner, while keeping in mind she may not be aware of her potentially annoying behavior.

I've searched on Google the expression "work another day" and I meet a sentence "If you enjoy what you do, you'll never work another day in your life", so I guess "work another day" mean "feel tired at work", right? But I still don't understand the expression "Females do not call their males every day at work and ask them what they are doing because they do not understand that their partners are working yet another day". What does the writer mean in this sentence?

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    You should cite the author and title. That is standard practice on the site. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Oct 26 '16 at 10:48
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Females do not call their males every day at work and ask them what they are doing because they do not understand that their partners are working yet another day.

It's a poorly written run-on sentence. so no wonder it's confusing. The real problem is at the start of the sentence with the "do not". You might think it negates the next word "call", but it actually negates the entire clause that begins with "because". At first glance, what you might think the author is saying is:

Females do not do [X] because of [Y]

but that doesn't make sense in context. The author says that females will call you at work, why in the next sentence does he say they don't call you?

So we have to assume the sentence is written out of order. This is the actual structure:

Females do [X], not because of [Y]. Instead it's because of [Z])

As for your specific problem with "are working yet another day", don't fret too much. In my opinion, it's a clumsy turn of phrase that doesn't make immediate sense. My guess is that the author is saying that your workday doesn't change often enough to rate a phone call every day -- as if you are thinking, "It's just my usual work, why does she keep calling me to ask how it's going? It's going the same as yesterday!"

Here's how the author could have written the sentence:

Females [call you at work all the time], not because [they don't understand that you are just working as usual and there is nothing new to discuss]. Instead [they call you because they care about you in their feminine manner ...]

Edit: I should also mention the double negative "... not because they don't ... This structure is confusing even for native speakers, especially if the negatives are not near each other (as in the original sentence). Unfortunately, this is not an uncommon structure in English.

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The noun phrase (NP) another day here serves as an adverbial of time. We use adverbials of time (yesterday, last week, last year, etc.) to talk about when, for how long, and how often something happens.

These adverbials are often used without a preposition (such as for):

  • I stayed (for) [two weeks]NP in Morocco.
  • They worked (for) [a year]NP on that project.
  • He survived (for) [four days]NP without water.
  • He lived (for) [a long time]NP in Yangon.

Thus, the phrase you are concerned with means:

...working (for) [another day]NP.

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