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We all know here 'some more' used as an 'adverb':

Would you like some more cake?

I think we still need to practice some more.

If the rice is still not cooked, add some more water.

Would you like some more potatoes?

I need to work on it some more.

I wonder how 'some more' used as an 'adverb' can be placed before noun in bold sentence. Is it grammatical?

I conclude that 'more' is likely to be an adjective and then 'some' can be used as an 'adverb' on above examples.

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    You've got the analysis wrong, "Some more" is not an adverb; it is a DP (determinative phrase) in which "more" is a determinative modified by the determinative "some". – BillJ Oct 26 '16 at 19:21
2

In

i. He walked more rapidly.

rapidly is an adverb modifying the verb walked, and more is an adverb modifying the adverb rapidly.

In

ii. We still need to practice some more

more is an adverb modifying the verb to practice, and some is an adverb modifying the adverb more.

As you recognize, more can be either an adjective or an adverb, so here is a second way to understand your sentence analyzing more as an "adjective":

iii. We need to do some more [something].

In iii, [something] could be eating, drinking, talking, practicing -- any "gerund" understood to have been derived from the main verb.

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    I wouldn't go along with you here. "Some" is not an adverb; it is a determinative modifying the determinative "more". "Some more" is thus a DP (determinative phrase) marking the noun ("cake", "water", "potatoes") as indefinite. – BillJ Oct 26 '16 at 19:25
  • Well, we could also call some a quantifier. I took Mickey's question to be how/whether more could be an adjective and/or an adverb, and let him keep his analysis of some as "adverb". – Torsten Oct 26 '16 at 19:31
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    Yes, the determinative "more" has to do with quantification, but it is not an adjective or an adverb. "Some" is also a determinative; in this case it is modifying "more". Together they form the DP "some more". – BillJ Oct 26 '16 at 19:42
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    @BillJ Seems to me that you have a useful and helpful answer to contribute here, and I can't figure out why you don't write it. – P. E. Dant Reinstate Monica Oct 26 '16 at 23:40
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More is not an adverb in the first sentence.

I think we still need to practice some more.

more is a pronoun (the direct object of practice)

some is a called a determiner by some resources (see Oxford dictionary) and an adjective by others (American Heritage). See below for links.

Would you like some more cake?

When you actually name the noun, then more is a determiner; some resources consider it an adjective. (American Heritage for one)

Some becomes a determiner or, a predeterminer.

If you have some only, as in

Would you like some?

some is a pronoun, or noun

See Oxford dictionary

more

some

American Heritage: some

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Note that "more" can be either an adjective or an adverb, depending on how it's used. Also note that an adverb can either precede or follow a verb:

They quickly drove to the store

They drove quickly to the store

Although it's probably not good style, an adverb can commonly appear far away from the verb:

They drove to the store quickly.

So in your examples, even though "some more" appears before a noun, it's not immediately clear whether it modifies the verb, or the following noun.

Would you like some more cake?

How much do you want?" Some more. Or, "How much cake do you want?" Some more.

If the rice is still not cooked, add some more water.

"How much do I add?" Some more. Or, "How much water do I add?" Some more.

I need to work on it some more.

"How much do you need to work?" Some more. Or, "How much do you need to work on it? Some more.

Either way works. It just depends on what part of the sentence you choose to emphasize.

Ultimately, remember that labeling parts of speech, in any language, is only an artificial exercise designed to help with comprehension. What's more important is how well you can communicate in that language.

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    Some" is not an adverb; it is a determinative modifying the determinative "more". "Some more" is thus a DP (determinative phrase) marking the noun ("cake", "water", "potatoes") as indefinite. – BillJ Oct 26 '16 at 19:26
  • @BillJ "More" is an adverb, or at least it can be. In the sentence "I want more" is it acting as an adjective or an adverb? Is it modifying "want" or some unspoken direct object? Honestly, it seems like it could go either way, so perhaps there's some kind of in-between part of speech you'd call it? – Andrew Oct 26 '16 at 19:28
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    Adverbs typically modify verbs and adjectives, not nouns. In "I want more", "more" is a fused determiner-head where the determiner and the head of the NP are fused together (cf, "I want more cake") – BillJ Oct 26 '16 at 19:29
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    @BillJ and Andrew Something to think about: We talked, and talked, and talked some more. (I'm not going to say what this some more is, but my point is sometimes, or actually most of the time, it's not the most important thing for learners to be able to tell what exactly a part of a sentence is.) – Damkerng T. Oct 26 '16 at 20:00
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    +1 @DamkerngT. Right you are! This OP needs first to understand what the gallumphing ramdoozle is working on: the noun or the verb. Only after that is clear he can profitably move to what it's called, and why. – P. E. Dant Reinstate Monica Oct 26 '16 at 23:36

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