1

Can I use the first sentence in lieu of the second?

1.Let me introduce you to the man that his company is hiring employees

2.Let me introduce you to the man whose company is hiring employees

If both are used, which one is more common?
Does one seem more weird than the other?

3

I would say that only

Let me introduce you to the man whose company is hiring employees

is correct, if you wanted to rewrite your first sentence to avoid whose you could make it

Let me introduce you to the man who owns the company hiring employees

  • Ahh, but do we know if the man is an employee or the employer? I agree it's more likely to be the second, but we do not know who for certain. – Mari-Lou A Oct 28 '16 at 7:50
  • Seeing as 'whose' is a possessive (as an employee I don't think I possess the company for which I work) pronoun, I would think he's the owner - but I see your point, do you have a suggestion to improve my answer? – Christian B Oct 28 '16 at 7:57
  • Just specify that if the person being presented is the boss (employer) than using who owns is acceptable. If the person being presented is a chief executive, or market manager (etc.) than another solution should be used to avoid ambiguity. – Mari-Lou A Oct 28 '16 at 8:02

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