1

1. This is the verse from the song of the Doors.

2. This is the verse from the Doors's song.

Although the second sentence seems even to me a little bit odd, I would like to ask if it is possible to express the possessive in this case this way.

2

This is the verse that I was telling you about from the song that I was telling you about by The Doors.

This verse is from the song that I was telling you about by The Doors.

"...from Doors's song" [without the article] would be ungrammatical. We refer to the name of a musical band with the article when the article is a part of their name (The Beatles; The Doors; The Rolling Stones) but we don't use it when it is not part of the name (Crowded House).

"... from the Doors's song" would be unidiomatic as well. The phrase would be spoken as follows if the band's name was put in front of the word song; the article would be dropped and there would be no zizz sound at the end marking a possessive; the band's name becomes adjectival:

Listen! This is that Beatles song I was telling you about.

Listen! This is that Doors song I was telling you about.

Listen! This is the Crowded House song I was telling you about.

Some people would put an apostrophe there after the name , Beatles', while others would not. Some would make the possessive in this way: Beatles's, Doors's; but the typographic representation would not reflect the language as spoken.

  • 1
    Just to clarify (or maybe actually muddy the issue) on the part about articles and band names, there would still be an article in a case like "I really love the Crowded House song Mean to Me." Because the article belongs to the song and not the band name. – Tofystedeth Oct 28 '16 at 18:15
  • Example duly added :) – Tᴚoɯɐuo Oct 30 '16 at 11:28

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