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Success is one of the most fascinating and misunderstood topics in the world, so let me start by laying a solid foundation for understanding how things really are, because I doubt you already know. If we were on the same page and you knew what I know, it is unlikely that you would be reading this.

What does "If we were on the same page and you knew what I know, it is unlikely that you would be reading this" mean? Does it mean " If you and I have the same thinking and you knew what I know, you would not want to read this book"?

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    Yes, it means almost what you think. The last clause should be "...you would not have to read this book". – P. E. Dant Oct 30 '16 at 2:32
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You are very close to understanding the author's meaning. It is helpful to think of the sentence as meaning "if you you (the reader) knew as much about success as I do, you would probably not read this book because you don't need to gain any more knowledge about success".

It is also probably intended as a little bit funny that the author uses "on the same page" to mean "having the same understanding/knowing as much" since you are literally on the same page... as in the page of the book.

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