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Is use of "such as" in the following sentences correct grammatically and conceptually?

The secondary flow loss is due to interaction between vortices and boundary layer of suction and hub surfaces, such as tip leakage and hose-shoe vortices, in Wells turbine.

marked as duplicate by P. E. Dant, Nathan Tuggy, Varun Nair, Glorfindel, Peter Nov 3 '16 at 13:54

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  • That is a complex English for me. I am grateful that guide me more about my quastion – user19061 Nov 3 '16 at 6:59
  • We hope you read and understand the question and answer at the above link (the link is also here.) It should make the usage clear. – P. E. Dant Nov 3 '16 at 7:01
  • The phrase "such as" is introducing examples of what has already been explained. Its meaning is pretty much the same as "for example" but it cannot always be used as a direct replacement. – Mick Nov 3 '16 at 8:15
  • @Mick The dupe question resulted in good answers to this question. – P. E. Dant Nov 3 '16 at 8:24
  • @P.E.Dant I disagree. They are rather technical and, frankly, I began to lose the will to live whilst trying to read them. The level of English used would be appropriate in EL&U, perhaps. – Mick Nov 3 '16 at 8:29
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The usage of such as is correct in detailing examples used in your passage.

Alternatives for

such as
interaction ..., such as tip leakage and hose-shoe vortices,...

can be

for example
interaction ..., for example tip leakage and hose-shoe vortices,...

like
interaction ..., like tip leakage and hose-shoe vortices,...

without lose of understanding or meaning.

Also, I think your sentence should read

The secondary flow loss is due to interactions, such as tip leakage and hose-shoe vortices, between vortices and the suction and hub surface boundary layer in a Wells turbine.

the original placement of the such as clause seemed awkward.

  • That's better. Much better. Even I understand it. – Mick Nov 3 '16 at 9:11

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