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Could you please suggest some words to replace "in order to"?

I am writing a technical paper.

The fifteen cells have been used in the tip clearance zone in order to properly predict interaction between leakage flow and suction surface of turbine blade.

closed as off-topic by Glorfindel, user3169, shin, snailcar Nov 19 '16 at 20:50

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question should include more details than have been provided here. Please edit to add the research you have done in your efforts to answer the question, or provide more context. See: Details, Please." – user3169, shin, snailcar
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 2
    Can one replace it with what? Please use the edit link to add more details to your question. If you don't, it may unfortunately be closed. – P. E. Dant Nov 3 '16 at 8:40
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    Ok, What should i explain? You say me until i explain more about that. My English language is not good. – user19061 Nov 3 '16 at 9:00
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    if your English language is not good, why are you attempting to write a technical paper in English? You tell us that you want to replace the expression in order to, but you don't say what you want to replace it with! There are dozens of ways to rephrase those sentences. You're asking us to proofread. – P. E. Dant Nov 3 '16 at 9:42
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    Well, I have two reasons: 1. I want to learn more about English language. 2. First, I write all of the paper and then give to a English language expert for editing that. it is better for me and the expert. Ok? – user19061 Nov 3 '16 at 9:55
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    I can't think of any better words to use in this context. – JavaLatte Nov 3 '16 at 16:58
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You have three choices here:

  • The fifteen cells have been used in the tip clearance zone in order to properly predict interaction between leakage flow and suction surface of turbine blade.

  • The fifteen cells have been used in the tip clearance zone to properly predict interaction between leakage flow and suction surface of turbine blade.

  • The fifteen cells have been used in the tip clearance zone so as to properly predict interaction between leakage flow and suction surface of turbine blade.

Yet, as you have mentioned that you are writing a technical paper I recommend you use "in order to" so as to imply a degree of formality.

More information can be read here http://www.englishgrammar.org/order/

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    OK, but i am using "in order to" in my paper very much. so I have to use other words. no? – user19061 Nov 3 '16 at 10:22
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    It's a formal paper right? You can interchangeably use 'to' and 'in order to' (preferred) and in some cases, depending on the verb, you can say 'so as to' or a less formal 'so to'. – SovereignSun Nov 3 '16 at 10:28
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    Yes. formal paper – user19061 Nov 3 '16 at 10:44
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The sentence that you gave is perfectly good English (in the area that you are asking about) - but in one other place there's a problem:

The fifteen cells have been used in the tip clearance zone in order to properly predict interaction between leakage flow and suction surface of the turbine blade.

And maybe "of" is not strictly correct. If you are talking about the surface of the blade, it probably should be:

The fifteen cells have been used in the tip clearance zone in order to properly predict interaction between leakage flow and suction surface at the turbine blade.

If for some reason you want to replace "in order to", you can use the following:

The fifteen cells have been used in the tip clearance zone to properly predict the interaction between leakage flow and suction surface of the turbine blade.

The difference is very subtle. It's one of emphasis: "in order to" emphasises the purpose of the fifteen cells, while the above is just a statement of why you did what you did.

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    I think that the OP just wanted some help in defeating an automated plagiarism checker. – Mick Nov 3 '16 at 9:40
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    @Mick Naïf that I am, this never occurred to me, but the truth of your statement is obvious. – P. E. Dant Nov 3 '16 at 9:47
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    Yes. You are right, Mick – user19061 Nov 3 '16 at 9:56
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    @P.E.Dant I often wonder how much of the help we give here is for that very purpose. – Mick Nov 3 '16 at 10:24
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    @user19061: It would be plagiarism if you changed the wording, but didn't cite the source. If you change the wording and give an in-line citation/footnote citation showing where you got the idea from, it's OK. – sumelic Nov 19 '16 at 2:50

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