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Is use of "a bit" in the following sentences correct grammatically and conceptually? Is the following sentences correct grammatically?If it is not , kindly suggest ways to make it clearer.

Further, this type of interaction inconstant thickness blade is a bit more than variable thickness blade. This could be due to more thickness of constant thickness blade at the hub.

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You have a quantifier, but it really needs an adjective. A bit more what? "Evident"? "Pronounced"?

As with another question of yours I answered, you have words that should be pluralised: "...a bit more than variable thickness blades."

If you're writing something technical, consider swapping "a bit" for more formal words as appropriate, such as "slightly" or "noticeably".

  • OK, Thank. You are right. I correct as follow: "Further, the strength of these vortices in constant thickness blade is a bit more than variable thickness blade. " Is it OK? – user19061 Nov 3 '16 at 16:01
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    @user19061 You haven't corrected either of the problems I described. Please re-read the answer. – Dan Nov 3 '16 at 16:51
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    @user19061 - The problem with the sentence is that you're comparing two completely different things. Cut the sentence down to its most essential parts: "the strength of these vortices...is more than (this) blade". The strength is more than the blade? That's not what you mean, you mean the strength of the vortices for the constant thickness blade is more than the strength of the vortices for the variable thickness blade. – stangdon Nov 3 '16 at 16:58
  • stangdon, now is this OK? for preventing repetitive words(here, vortices): "Further, the strength of these vortices for the constant thickness blade is a bit more than these for variable thickness blade." – user19061 Nov 3 '16 at 19:05
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    @user19061 - Very close! I would phrase it as "the strength of these vortices for the constant-thickness blade is a bit more than that of those for the variable-thickness blade." It has to be that, not these, because "the strength", which is the real subject, is singular. those refers to the vortices, though. – stangdon Nov 3 '16 at 21:27

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