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Our clothes sell so well in this country that we have no need to export.

Two questions.

  1. Our clothes sell so well in this country...

Is this part of the sentence a noun phrase although it has two words which are not nouns (so and well)? Can a noun phrase have adverbs and adjectives in it? Please explain.

  1. We have no need to export.

The second part of the sentence does not show any tense like present or past or future. Sometimes sentences have no situation, like present or past as in "all is well" or "everything is good". Does in such cases in sense of grammar we should use "be" verbs or sentence will be used as the present simple tense? What are the rules of grammar in such situations?

  • Can you tell us what you mean by Does in such cases in sense of grammar we should use "be" verbs or sentence will be used as the present simple tense? Do you mean In such cases should we use "be" verbs or will the sentence be in the present simple tense? (That is just a guess.) – P. E. Dant Nov 4 '16 at 4:54
  • Sell is the (present tense) verb in the first clause; have is the (present tense) verb in the second clause. But you're correct: the use of the present tense here refers to a time that extends indefinitely into the past, includes now, and extends indefinitely into the future, just like: He is smart. – Alan Carmack Nov 4 '16 at 5:00
  • To answer your 1st question. No, the first part is not an NP. It's an expression that could in theory stand alone as an independent clause. It has the NP "Our clothes" as subject, "sell" as verb , "so well" as an AdvP. and "in this country" as a PP. The latter two elements are adjuncts in clause structure (they modify the VP). The second part is a content clause functioning as complement to the adverb "well" to give the AdvP "so well (that) have no need to export. – BillJ Nov 4 '16 at 11:40
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Our clothes sell so well in this country

Is not a noun phrase. We can test this by asking if it can be replaced by a pronoun and retain an essential meaning. It cannot be in your full sentence:

  • They [Our/the clothes] have no need to export.

Noun phrases can contain adjectives and adverbs:

The fine clothes that sell so well in this country are not exported.

The emphasized constituent is a noun phrase that serves as the subject of the sentence. If a similar phrase begins with our, some grammars would classify it as a determiner phrase.

-- https://wikipedia.org/wiki/Noun_phrase

We have no need to export.

The verb have is the present simple tense in traditional grammar. Its use here is sometimes called a general truth. It means that the speaker describes something that is true or operational now, and has no intention to indicate that the state has any relevant beginning or ending time.

The is represents the simple present form of to be in All is well and everything is good and is used to communicate the same idea about current states.

This kind of use is described as fact or generalization here: http://www.englishpage.com/verbpage/simplepresent.html

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