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Someone wrote this comment to an answer

+1 for teaching-a-one-to-fish and suchlike.

I googled the phrase and stumbled upon the saying, ''give a man a fish, and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish, and you feed him for a lifetime''. But couldn't find any website mentioning that it's a phrase.

closed as off-topic by FumbleFingers, Glorfindel, Chenmunka, Mari-Lou A, P. E. Dant Nov 4 '16 at 19:27

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  • As far as I know it's not a set phrase. I think you got it right, it's a made up version of what you already found on your own. – Man_From_India Nov 4 '16 at 16:35
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    It's made up on the spot, which probably explains the grammatical mix-up. It should have been "teaching-a-man-to-fish" or "teaching-one-to-fish". – MSalters Nov 4 '16 at 16:40
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    @Sanjukta Was it written by a non-native speaker? Because the use of a one like the way it is used in this sentence doesn't seem like it's used by a native speaker. – Man_From_India Nov 4 '16 at 16:56
  • @Man_From_India I just don't know. – Tyto alba Nov 4 '16 at 17:01
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    I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it's about a non-idiomatic usage with no significant currency. – FumbleFingers Nov 4 '16 at 17:16
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It's not a standard phrase, just a slightly ungrammatical reference to the phrase you already found. I would probably say "teach-a-man-to-fish and suchlike" since that's a more direct paraphrase of the aphorism.

I don't know there's much more to add to this answer, since you seem to have found it yourself, so I'll leave you with this (darkly) humorous twist from one of my favorite authors:

"Give a man a fire and he's warm for a day, but set fire to him and he's warm for the rest of his life." -- Terry Pratchett.

  • That quotation is really nice :D – Man_From_India Nov 4 '16 at 17:14
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    @Man_From_India well, it's kind of the opposite of "nice" -- but funny if you're ok with dark humor. Also I felt it is of interest to English learners as a clever example of twisting a phrase to be very different, as well as the double meaning of "the rest of his life". – Andrew Nov 4 '16 at 18:01
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    That Pratchett quote was also the topic of a question here.... – Hellion Nov 4 '16 at 21:10

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