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I have the following ideas:

Roof outer boundaries are finally connected to the fixed inner bounds by snapping, fixed outer bounds (gutters). And then by allowing a flexible sweeping of other (unfixed) edges framework of closed polygons having their symmetries preserved are created. Later, subsequent successive line intersection leads to closed polygons.

As each idea interacts with the next, I am having trouble linking them.

Here, I have my best try with while:

While allowing a flexible sweeping of (outer) unfixed edges, fixed bounds (gutters) are snapped to the fixed inner bounds to construct framework of closed polygons having their preserved symmetries. Successive intersection of adjacent lines are then formed a closed polygon.

Can anyone help me to make a complete sentence which would be accepted in an academic field?

  • Please capitalize the first letter of each sentence. The question is hardly readable in it's current form and it can drive people away from answering your question. – Mistu4u Sep 30 '13 at 16:14
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    I guess I'd write it as: “While allowing flexible sweeping of the unfixed outer edges, fixed bounds (gutters) are snapped to the fixed inner bounds to construct a framework of closed polygons with their symmetries preserved. Successive intersections of adjacent lines then form a closed polygon.” It's hard to say if that a good way to say it, though, because I have no idea what you're talking about. – Tyler James Young Sep 30 '13 at 21:48
  • You don't seem to have a question about grammar here, or even sentence construction in any general sense. You might try asking about specific words or rules that are difficult for you, or rewriting this in a way that wouldn't require further knowledge of your project to answer but would still be helpful to you. – Tyler James Young Sep 30 '13 at 21:56
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    I really think you need to express yourself more simply. Sure, you're writing a technical paper, but you don't get any brownie points for making it hard to understand. You must first write clear sentences; complicated can come later. – snailplane Oct 2 '13 at 9:59
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I wouldn't use "while" there – it makes the sentence hard to understand.

Why? Because, at the beginning of a sentence, while can set the reader up for a change in thought. Here's what NOAD says:

while (conj.)
1 during the time that; at the same time as : nothing much changed while he was away.
2 whereas (indicating a contrast) : one person wants out, while the other wants the relationship to continue.
• in spite of the fact that; although : while I wouldn't recommend a night-time visit, by day the area is full of interest.

It's that submeaning of Def #2 that gets you into trouble. So, when you write:

While allowing a flexible sweeping of (outer) unfixed edges...

it's easy to interpret that as:

In spite of the fact that allowing a flexible sweeping of (outer) unfixed edges...

Unfortunately, your question doesn't elaborate on the nature of the linked thoughts. Is this a step-by-step procedure? Is there some cause and effect going on? Because of that, I can't give you a definitive answer, but I thought your version with "then" was just fine. You just need to eliminate the leading "and", and add a comma to splice the sentence better:

Roof outer boundaries are connected to the fixed inner bounds by snapping, fixed outer bounds (gutters). Then, by allowing a flexible sweeping of other (unfixed) edges, a framework of closed polygons having their symmetries preserved are created. Later, subsequent successive line intersection leads to closed polygons.

Sorry if I didn't get that right, but the subject matter is a bit specialized.

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  • The last line is quite true. And truly I don't understand what is the need for joining and making the subject more hard to understand. Anyway +1 for your answer. – Mistu4u Oct 1 '13 at 3:59

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