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Is use of "lead to maintain" in the following sentences correct grammatically and conceptually?

As shown in Fig. 2, the existence of symmetrical blades lead to maintain the direction of the tangential force (Fu) acting on the blade during the bidirectional air flow.

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    I think the author is trying to express: "As shown in Fig. 2, the use of symmetrical blades maintains the angle of the tangential force (Fu) acting on the blade during bidirectional air flow." The writer of seems to be mixing up the two different outcomes of "leads to..." and "maintains..." – Peter Nov 8 '16 at 20:17
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    Looks to me like a typo for tend to maintain. (I'm tempted to +1 "Fu", though.) – P. E. Dant Nov 8 '16 at 20:41
  • Peter, angle of the tangential force is wrong. I want to say that tangential force is not sensitive to the direction of incoming flow. – user19061 Nov 8 '16 at 21:04
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    "As shown in Fig 2, the symmetrical blades maintain a constant direction of the tangential force..." – P. E. Dant Nov 9 '16 at 0:18
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To lead means "to be the first in a line" and/or "to control the movement of things following you."

A leader might stay in one spot and "lead" by giving orders to other people, but it does not mean "stay one one spot and control the movement of things moving ahead of you" in the sense of things moving in a line.

In any event lead {infinitive} doesn't work. You can lead something that can be considered a fluid or a force with a directed velocity, like "the ducts lead the heat out of the car."

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There are multiple issues with this sentence, even beyond the one you have identified, namely:

(1) "lead to maintain" is a semantically incorrect use of "lead", as you noted

(2) "lead" does not agree with the singular noun "existence"

(3) "during" does not work with a noun like "flow", which is not a process

I would rewrite it as follows:

As shown in Fig. 2, the existence of symmetrical blades serves to maintain the direction of the tangential force (Fu) acting on the blade {in the presence, as a consequence} of the bidirectional air flow.

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