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Nowadays a variety of kitchen gadgets are now available in the market.

In the sentence, is it acceptable to use the adverb 'now' that means 'immediately or at once'?

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    Now is redundant--you've already expressed this idea with "nowadays". Nov 12, 2016 at 13:37
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    The word you want is readily. Nowadays these products are readily available. Nov 12, 2016 at 13:48
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    @StoneyB and TRomano: Your comments would be better as answers. Comments aren't for answering the question.
    – LMS
    Nov 12, 2016 at 14:23
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    I'd like to know whether the meaning of the word 'now' in the sentence can be 'immediately or at once'.
    – thein lwin
    Nov 12, 2016 at 14:28
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    @LMS apparently the unofficial rule for answers in comments is "plagiarize". Don't hesitate to put the commented answer in an actual answer, and earn points for yourself.
    – Andrew
    Nov 12, 2016 at 23:23

2 Answers 2

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As both StoneyB and TRomano point out in the above comments, the second "now" is redundant, but you can still use other words to express the same concept:

Nowadays a variety of kitchen gadgets are readily available in the market.

Nowadays you can easily buy a variety of kitchen gadgets at the market.

Nowadays a variety of kitchen gadgets have become available in the market.

A variety of kitchen gadgets have recently become available in the market.

And so on.

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Yes it is correct. You can simply just say "A variety of kitchen gadgets are now available on the market". The "nowadays" is redundant and doesn't really convey the sense of immediacy that "now" does. But if you want to talk less immediately and just talk about in this general time period, then you say "Nowadays, a variety of kitchen gadgets are available on the market". You can use one or the other, but not both.

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  • You say it is correct but then say you only need one of 'nowadays' and 'now'. So, you are saying it is not correct. It is true that you only need one or the other.
    – Chenmunka
    Jan 13, 2017 at 14:51

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