2

Source: TCP/IP For Dummies, 6th Edition by Candace Leiden and Marshall Wilensky (2009)

Example:

First of all, we don’t recommend setting up a host to be both a client and server. Just because something is possible doesn’t mean you should do it. A computer that tries to do everything has more congestion than Marshall's sinuses.

What is this in reference to?

3

It's a joke, referring to the (presumable) fact that one of the authors suffers from congested sinuses.

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4

It's a play on a double meaning of the word "congested" (from Oxford Dictionaries):

congested
Adjective
1. (of a road or place) so crowded with traffic or people as to hinder or prevent freedom of movement:
"the congested streets of the West End"
"the road was congested with refugees"

2. (of the respiratory tract) blocked with mucus so as to hinder breathing:
"his nose was congested"

It's also common to refer to the data transmitted on a computer network as "traffic," and hence refer to a network with insufficient capacity as "congested:"

traffic
Noun
2. The messages or signals transmitted through a communications network
"data traffic between remote workstations"

In this case, it's making a joke about Marshall (Wilensky), one of the authors, who we must assume has frequently-congested sinuses.

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  • I didn't understand who Marshall was until StoneyB pointed out he's one of the authors. – Andrew Nov 13 '16 at 19:20
  • 1
    @Andrew: I thought it would be clear since the authors are mentioned in the question, but I've added a note about it. Thanks! – LMS Nov 13 '16 at 19:25

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