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In the following sentences I try to state the result of something in the past. I'm not sure if they need would or not, or if I use the right tense

Unfortunately, I had bad teachers who never tried to teach me math in an easy and sweet way so that I became attracted to it

Unfortunately, I had bad teachers who never tried to teach me math in an easy and sweet way so that it attracted me

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    It is not clear what will be introduced by so that, the result of not having teachers who taught math in a sweet way, or what would have resulted had the teachers taught math in a sweet way. When we get to the end of the sentence, we realize that so that has introduced a hypothetical result, not a past actual result. So you'd need to say "so that I would have become attracted to it". Youj could also recast the so-that-clause as a restrictive that-clause in the active voice: ...in a way that got me interested. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Nov 13 '16 at 20:38
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The so-that clause can introduce the actual result:

Unfortunately, I had bad teachers who never taught me math in a sweet way, so that I never became attracted to it.

Or it can introduce a result that might have happened had things been different:

Unfortunately, I had bad teachers who never taught me math in a sweet way so that I would have become attracted to it.

The so-that clause can be an elaboration upon "never taught me" or an elaboration upon "sweet way". As a result of those two branches being possible, this is a little unclear:

Unfortunately, I had bad teachers who never taught me math in a sweet way so that I became attracted to it.

You can express the idea unambiguously with a simple restrictive that-clause:

Unfortunately, I had bad teachers who never taught me math in a way that got me interested in the subject.

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