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  1. Nowadays domestic robots perform simple tasks such as vacuum cleaning and grass cutting.
  2. They are now available.

If the two sentences are joined by using the relative pronoun,

  1. Nowadays domestic robots that perform simple tasks such as vacuum cleaning and grass cutting are now available.

Is the new sentence correct? If not, please explain it to me.

  • Yes, except that you don't need both "nowadays" and "now". Ditch one or the other. – BillJ Nov 16 '16 at 8:27
  • Thanks, BillJ. But 'nowadays' modifies 'perform' and 'now' modifies 'available'. – thein lwin Nov 16 '16 at 8:33
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    No, "nowadays" and "now" are both modifying the copula clause "domestic robots that perform simple tasks such as vacuum cleaning and grass cutting are available now/nowadays. – BillJ Nov 16 '16 at 8:47
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    You should understand that the temporal adjuncts "now" and "nowadays" both refer to when the robots are available. It is not the "performing" that is a available nowadays, but the entire noun phrase "domestic robots that perform simple tasks such as vacuum cleaning and grass cutting". – BillJ Nov 16 '16 at 9:16
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    Look: the relative clause defines exactly which robots are being referred to, i.e. those of the kind that can perform certain tasks. The temporal adjunct "nowadays" then states when such robots are available. You don't need to repeat that with a second adjunct. We know they can perform these tasks now otherwise they wouldn't be available now, would they? Think about it. – BillJ Nov 16 '16 at 10:30

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