1

Source

The sentence :

Among the biggest gainers since election day have been shares of Fannie Mae (OTCQB:FNMA) and Freddie Mac (OTCQB:FMCC) which are no strangers to large price swings themselves.

"Which are no strangers to large price swings themselves" is an attributive clause that modifies the noun phrase "shares of Fannie Mae (OTCQB:FNMA) and Freddie Mac (OTCQB:FMCC)".

I can't understand "which are no strangers to large price swings themselves".

Can I rewrite it as shares of F&F are no strangers to large price swings themselves?

It is hard for me to understand that "shares of F&F are no strangers to large price swings themselves".

*F&F is abbreviation of "Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac".

I had new discovery in the http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/be-no-stranger-to-sth

It is said that "no stranger to" is an idiom meaning "to be familiar with a particular experience or activity".

F&F are high volatility stocks from the historical data, it would rise 40% in one single day and down 50% in one single day too,it is speculation to buy the common stocks of F&F,so can we say this?

"shares of F&F are no strangers to large price swings"

Is that the same as saying "shares of F&F are familiar with high volatility"?

1
  • Please don't use "backtick" formatting to set off text; use blockquotes, quotation marks, or italics instead. – P. E. Dant Reinstate Monica Nov 17 '16 at 4:33
8
+50

No stranger to something is an idiomatic expression meaning:

  • familiar with something or with some place

    • She's certainly no stranger to hard work. The nation's disease-fighting agency is no stranger to epidemics. He's no stranger to British pubs.

(Cambridge Dictionary of American Idioms)

  • That the two stocks are no stranger to large price swings means that the two stocks are often subject to considerable ups and downs in price changes on the Stock Exchange, or, to put it more professionally, that their price volatility is high.
2

Your passage is taking about two publicly traded stock: FNMA and FMCC.

The passage is saying they have been among the biggest gainers over the past week, large positive price swing.

The stocks themselves happen to be volatile stocks and experience large price swings, both positive and negative on a regular basis ("no stranger").

1
  • It is said that no stranger to is a idiom,means to be familiar with a particular experience or activity:. – showkey Nov 17 '16 at 4:02

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.