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I've read in Longman English Grammar (PDF, page 258) that we use get and get / have+object+past participle in a non-causative way for accidents, disasters, etc. that happen beyond our control.

For example,

Don't join in the argument or you might get your nose punched.

She had her house destroyed in an earthquake.

I think using have in non-causative way is to use the experiential construction (Have+object+past participle usage).

But here in the first sentence get has also been used non-causatively.

Experiential construction shows the experience. So it's called experiential. But in the first sentence, the subject (you) hasn't yet experienced of being punched on his nose. But why is this sentence still in experiential construction?

Next question:

Do we use have and get non-causatively in every situation when something happens to us beyond our control?

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    They are just passive voice. "Don't join in the argument or someone might punch your nose.". "An earthquake destroyed her house." – John Feltz Nov 17 '16 at 16:21
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    I don't know why I'm getting close votes in this question – yubraj Nov 19 '16 at 6:38
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But in the first sentence, the subject (you) hasn't yet experienced of being punched on his nose. But why this sentence is still in Experiential construction ?

Because tense is separate from word choice. A sentence like "You will experience happiness" is perfectly fine, and describes an experience you will (I assume) have, even though it doesn't say whether you've already experienced it.

Do we use have and Get non-causativelx in every situation when something happens to us beyond our control ?

No, not at all. Firstly, there are some other constructions that have the same effect; for example, "My car gave out on me when I was twenty miles outside of town" means the same as "I had my car give out when […]". Secondly, we don't usually bother to indicate the experiencer explicitly; for example, we might just say "Her house was destroyed in an earthquake" and let people infer that this had an effect on her. (Sometimes this results in ambiguity; something like "Michael dropped it on the floor" doesn't specify whether he intentionally dropped it (Michael = agent), vs. whether it fell from his grasp (Michael = experiencer). In many cases it's clear from context; in other cases, it can be better to reword.)

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