2

Ok. So the situation is say, most people I come across hate Justin Bieber but I don't.

Then what should I say to state this fact?

  1. I don't hate Bieber like everyone else.

  2. I don't hate Bieber unlike everyone else.

Or could they maybe both work:

  1. I do not hate Bieber (the way) like everyone else (does).

  2. I do not hate Bieber (which is) unlike everyone else.

Meaning the same things in different wording.

  • The comma is your friend: "I don't hate Bieber, unlike everyone else." ... "I do not hate Bieber, unlike everyone else." – P. E. Dant Nov 22 '16 at 23:18
4

Like everyone else, I don't hate Bieber.

means that everyone else does not hate Justin Bieber, and you agree with them.

Unike everyone else, I don't hate Bieber.

means the opposite, that everyone hates Justin Bieber, and you disagree with them.

I don't hate Bieber the way everyone else does.

implies that while everyone hates Justin Bieber, you also hate him but in a different way. Or it could be that you don't hate him. We'd have to figure out the meaning from context.

  • Is it necessary to put the like/unlike part at the beginning,as you have done in your answer or the way I wrote it were also correct ? – user118494 Nov 22 '16 at 16:37
  • 1
    @user118494 - I don't think it's required to put it at the beginning, but I think there is less ambiguity with the sentence structured that way. The way you wrote it – I don't hate Bieber like everyone else – one might assume that means I don't hate Bieber the way I hate everyone else. – J.R. Nov 22 '16 at 17:46
  • 1
    @user118494 it's more about my personal preference than grammar. I think putting the "like" phrase at the beginning is clearer and more logical. But it's fine to say "I don't hate Bieber like everyone else". – Andrew Nov 22 '16 at 18:07

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.