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Ok. So the situation is say, most people I come across hate Justin Bieber but I don't.

Then what should I say to state this fact?

  1. I don't hate Bieber like everyone else.

  2. I don't hate Bieber unlike everyone else.

Or could they maybe both work:

  1. I do not hate Bieber (the way) like everyone else (does).

  2. I do not hate Bieber (which is) unlike everyone else.

Meaning the same things in different wording.

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  • The comma is your friend: "I don't hate Bieber, unlike everyone else." ... "I do not hate Bieber, unlike everyone else." Nov 22 '16 at 23:18
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Like everyone else, I don't hate Bieber.

means that everyone else does not hate Justin Bieber, and you agree with them.

Unike everyone else, I don't hate Bieber.

means the opposite, that everyone hates Justin Bieber, and you disagree with them.

I don't hate Bieber the way everyone else does.

implies that while everyone hates Justin Bieber, you also hate him but in a different way. Or it could be that you don't hate him. We'd have to figure out the meaning from context.

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  • Is it necessary to put the like/unlike part at the beginning,as you have done in your answer or the way I wrote it were also correct ?
    – user118494
    Nov 22 '16 at 16:37
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    @user118494 - I don't think it's required to put it at the beginning, but I think there is less ambiguity with the sentence structured that way. The way you wrote it – I don't hate Bieber like everyone else – one might assume that means I don't hate Bieber the way I hate everyone else.
    – J.R.
    Nov 22 '16 at 17:46
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    @user118494 it's more about my personal preference than grammar. I think putting the "like" phrase at the beginning is clearer and more logical. But it's fine to say "I don't hate Bieber like everyone else".
    – Andrew
    Nov 22 '16 at 18:07

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