1

English ain't my first language, so I'm getting confused on how I should use the word "next" in this sentence.

Which one is correct?

"Should I resign next from the Student Organisation?"

or

"Should I resign from the Student Organisation next?"

Thank you for your answers

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  • Either one is fine. – Lambie Jan 22 '17 at 20:48
3

I would say to use the second phrase:

"Should I resign from the Student Organization next?"

This phrase gives a more logical impression that you are using a series of steps to achieve something and this is the next step.

  • 1
    This is a concise answer which could be added to, by saying that depending on the previous sentence and how the sentence flows into this one, you could also use the sentence "Next, should I resign from the Student Organisation?", using the next as a precursor to, and indicating, the fact that you are going to talk about a possible following step. – Chris Rogers Nov 25 '16 at 23:36
0

The word ain't is no longer in common use by people with basic education. It might be in use regionally, but the people using it know it is not 'proper' English. It's an affect or slang and used with humour or in relaxed circumstances. I might use it in the same company where I would feel comfortable using a swear word. If you were joking, please excuse me. I completely understood what you meant.

"Should I resign from the Student Organisation next?" is fine, but I think I would say, "Next, should I resign from the Student Organisation?" It make the question more clear or concise -- we know exactly what you mean to say.

  • The OP probably knows that. Most people using ain't in forums like these know it is not kosher. Lots of people use it but you wouldn't use in a formal situation. *It is also dialectal (Black English and Southern). Some pretty sophisticated people use it as an emphatic verb. – Lambie Jan 22 '17 at 20:47

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