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Are the university's tutors officially involved in those groups?

If yes, how active those groups are and what I could be potentially missing compared to when not using those groups?

My question is about Facebook study groups. It doesn't really matter for the person I'm sending it to if my grammar is on point, but it does matter to me to be correct, so that in future I would not make similar mistake. Does the quoted sentence make sense?

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Yes. They do make sense if a person understands which groups are mentioned in the text.

  • Are the university's tutors officially involved in those groups? - The groups that you were talking about or mentioned earlier.

  • If yes, how active are those groups and what could I be potentially missing compared to when not using those groups? - Definitely will be understood should the first sentence be understood.

If you haven't mentioned the groups before the first sentence it is better to do it this way:

  • Are the university's tutors officially involved in the Facebook study groups? If yes, how active are those groups and what could I be potentially missing compared to when not using those groups?
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"If yes, how active are those groups and what could I be potentially missing compared to when not using those groups?"

This example, though it's correct it is very redundant. It would read better this way:

"If yes, how active are those groups and what might I be missing by not using them?"

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