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I am having 3 sentences and next comes because of the first one.

  1. Indeed, the absence of a segment causes a lack of graph edges which refer to that segment.
  2. The effect leads to a distorted cycle.
  3. As a result, a fault corner will be produced.

now, my problem is to make a one concise sentence telling all; so, here is my best try,

Indeed, the absence of a segment causes a lack of graph edges which refer to that segment which then leads to a distorted cycle and consequently a fault corner.

my question is, a case like above (i mean one thing happened because of another actions and so on..) what is the best way to explain. thanks.

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    This looks like proofreading to me. I don't see what the word "indeed" is doing here, but maybe a "valid" phrasing might be The absence of a segment leads to a lack of graph edges referencing that segment, which in turn leads to a distorted cycle causing a fault corner. That's assuming "fault corner" is some special technical usage I don't know of, otherwise the text needs more work. – FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica Oct 5 '13 at 16:21
  • @FumbleFingers: Thanks thanks... its grate. in the text I already talked about so I think I could use it here., "fault corner". also, Here I am giving reasons for some errors. So, I used "Indeed"... In that sense, could I use "indeed"? – niro Oct 5 '13 at 17:41
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    The close reason for proofreading says "Proofreading questions are off-topic unless a specific source of concern in the text is clearly identified." This question is about how to join sentences together in a specific fashion, and it identifies specific sources of concern, so I don't think it can be considered a "proofreading question" by this definition. – snailcar Oct 5 '13 at 18:01
  • @niro: Indeed you can use the word "indeed" like that, and it will work very well indeed! My sentence there is contrived, and obviously we wouldn't normally have two "uses" as well as a "mention" in the same sentence. As you already seem to realise, your use (and my first one) carry a sense of going [often, unexpectedly or controversially] further than what has already been said (my second usage has the "emphasising" sense of really, very much). I just didn't understand your usage because I haven't seen the earlier text. – FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica Oct 5 '13 at 19:41
  • @snailboat My vote is not among them, but I would imagine that close votes against this and similar questions might be motivated by the fact that the choice of example makes it so much more difficult to understand the specific linguistic difficulty at hand and provide advice that will be useful outside of this single instance. The question appears to be motivated more by a desire to have a specific piece of text rewritten by the community (that furthermore doesn't understand it and isn't provided any context with which to attempt to) than by a desire to understand some aspect of English. – Tyler James Young Oct 5 '13 at 21:49
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I think the best way is:

Indeed, the absence of a segment causes a lack of graph edges which refer to that segment, leading to a distorted cycle which produces a fault corner.

Alternatively:

Indeed, the absence of a segment causes a lack of graph edges referring to that segment, leading to a distorted cycle that produces a fault corner.

This assumes that the prior sentences cause the "indeed" to make sense. Otherwise, remove it.

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An alternative observation : "causes a lack of graph edges" is an awkward phrase.

A solution would be to rephrase:

"Indeed, in the absence of a graph segment, there can be no graph edges referring to that segment, leading to a distorted cycle, resulting in a fault corner".

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