0

I am going to make up an example with the verb, to entangle.

(ex) Mr. Brown encourages his students to apply their math skills in multiple ways. The students who solve math problems by different methods have excellent analytical skills and earn high marks. In contrast, those who are too entangled in only one problem-solving strategy lack strong reasoning skills.

Here, I want to express the fact that such students get caught or stuck all the time in one problem-solving method. Does the verb fit the context? Thanks a lot.

  • Thanks, mike. Let me change the last sentence to the following one. In contrast, those who are too focused on only one problem-solving strategy are easily entangled in their math tasks. Would the verb "entangled" fit better this way? Thanks. – davidtrinh Dec 11 '16 at 9:12
1

I'm not entirely sure that 'entangled' fits the context of the sentence here.

In the literal sense, it means to become twisted together, or interwoven with something else, but even idiomatically it means much the same - to become involved or mixed up in.

Your example seems to describe a student who only focuses on (or bothers to learn) one particular way of solving a problem, so possible alternatives would be:

  • In contrast, those who rely on only one problem-solving strategy...
  • In contrast, those who are are dependent on only one problem-solving strategy...
  • In contrast, those who are reliant on only one problem-solving strategy...

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.