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Is the use of redundant words grammatically correct? For example:

I wake up at 7am in the morning.

I came here as because you are ill.

  • "I wake up at 7am in the morning" is correct. "I came here as because you are ill" is not correct. "At 7am" "in the morning" say related but different things. Use as many as you want: "I woke up early / first thing / at 7am / in the morning / as the sun was rising / on a new day." On the other hand, "as because" is wrong. Both are conjunctions. – JeremyDouglass Nov 26 '16 at 12:56
  • Who actually says that? I can semi-sorta kinda like understand why the first pleonasm might be used (it's akin to RAS syndrome, people tend not to think about what the abbreviation stands for), but I've never actually heard the second one – it sounds ungrammatical. – userr2684291 Nov 26 '16 at 12:59
  • Cant I write as because fr double mentioning – Nikita Nov 26 '16 at 13:18
  • @JeremyDouglass I've just noticed your comment: “a.m.” literally means “before noon” (which effectively translates to 0000–1200 military time), thus rendering “a.m.” and “in the morning” equivalent. – userr2684291 Nov 26 '16 at 13:20
  • You don't use "buttered butter" speaking your mother tongue.What difference does it make? – V.V. Nov 26 '16 at 15:21
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I wake up at 7am in the morning.

This is grammatically correct but odd sounding, as it implies there's a 7am that doesn't exist in the morning.

I came here as because you are ill.

This is not grammatically correct. It looks like you are trying to join 2 clauses with 2 subordinating conjunctions and that does not work.

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The first one is not grossly incorrect but is quite odd-sounding, as though it's being said for a humorous purpose, or because the speaker experienced a cognitive hiccup and got momentarily lost in the middle of the sentence.

[edited to clarify that I was only responding to the 7am part]

  • Which is grammatically correct? The first is, the second ("as because") certainly isn't. – TonyK Nov 26 '16 at 18:54
  • I was only responding to the "7 am in the morning" – MMacD Nov 26 '16 at 19:09
  • I'm probably more relaxed about redundancies, since they rarely impede understanding. Strictly speaking, "7am in the morning" must be regarded as ungrammatical because there's only one slot for time, and "in the morning" is trying to crowd in when "7am" is already occupying the slot. – MMacD Nov 26 '16 at 19:14

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