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How to ask question politely and how to respond in the following context :

Context 1 If I want to ask how much he/she earns salary politely

How much salary you'r provided ? Or How much salary you are given ?

Context 2

If I want to ask politely how long he/she is working or doing his job'

How long have been working/doing your job ?

Context 3

If electricity goes off or come on

current went out/ came on

Context 4

politely asking for how many children

How many children you have ?

Context 5

school begins/starts

what time your school begins?

Context 6

If there are two roads/path to go to a villege/town, we need to chone one road/way/path

Let's go through this way ?

I'v tried my best to respond or ask question in above contexts. But I'm not sure

closed as too broad by Mari-Lou A, Nathan Tuggy, J.R. Nov 27 '16 at 9:01

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • These don't seem to be closely-related enough to all be under one question. (1 and 2 could be asked together, though.) And it's unclear what you mean by "how to react (express myself) in those six context [sic]." Are you asking how you would answer these questions if someone would ask you? – J.R. Nov 27 '16 at 9:04
  • I am going to edit my question – yubraj Nov 27 '16 at 12:19
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  1. "How much do you make?" or "What is your salary?" But this is considered to be an impolite question, at least in the US.

  2. "How long have you been at your job?"

  3. I'm not sure what you what to say here.

  4. "How many children do you have?" is fine.

  5. "What time does your school begin?"

  6. "Which way should we go?" "I think we should go this way?"

  • I'm asking how to ask question politely and how to react(express myself) in those six context – yubraj Nov 27 '16 at 5:30
  • @yubrajsharma what would you try to say if the electricity goes out? There are too many possible responses for me to give you just one, without more context. – Andrew Nov 27 '16 at 13:21
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    @Andrew - Your comment reminds me of a friend who, just after a lightning bolt struck near a building we were in, exclaimed, "Praise the Lord! The lights went out!" (So, yes, there really are several ways to say it.) That said, I think "The power went out" would be a good initial suggestion. – J.R. Nov 27 '16 at 19:27
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A lot depends on whether these questions are being asked formally or not - in particular, the first two questions have the potential to be asked in an interview type situation, where there is a very specific wording used compared to, say, asking a friend how much he or she makes.

Context 1 If I want to ask how much he/she earns salary

(formal) How much do you earn? (informal) How much do you make?

(English aside for a second, depending on the country, these type of questions can be illegal to ask in an interview. And in many cultures, is considered a rude question to ask, regardles of the wording used.)

Context 2

If I want to know how long he/she is working or doing his job'

(formal) How long have you been in this position? (formal) How long have you been with your current employer?

(informal) How long have you been working there?

Context 3

If electricity goes off or come on

The power went out. The power is down.

The power came back on.

Context 4

asking for how many children

How many children do you have ?

Context 5

school begins/starts

what time your school begins?

What time does you school begin?

Context 6

If there are two roads/path to go to a villege/town, we need to chone one road/way/path

(if it's a question) Which way would you like to go? Which road/street would you like to take?

(if it's a statement) Let's go this way.

  • I'm asking how to ask question politely and how to react(express myself) in those six context – yubraj Nov 27 '16 at 5:31

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