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It was such a cold yesterday that we could not go out.

It was such a cold day yesterday that we could not go out.

Which sentence is grammatical or better?

  • The first, cold day yesterday, is natural; the second is not idiomatic. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Nov 27 '16 at 11:21
  • Yesterday is commonly used adverbially. So it'll be weird if the cold modify it. But I think both of them are grammatical. – user178049 Nov 27 '16 at 11:23
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    The second is not something speakers would typically say, any more than they would say "It is such a hot today". We would say "It's such a hot day today". Using today and yesterday and tomorrow as nouns is certainly possible in the proper contexts, but using them as nouns here in this context would be very unnatural. It might be possible in a literary context, say, but it's not what you would hear on the street. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Nov 27 '16 at 11:28
  • Is"a cold day yesterday" appositive structure? – learner Nov 27 '16 at 11:49
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    You can think of yesterday as meaning "on the day before (this day)" and tomorrow as meaning "on the morrow". These are not simple nouns, like day, but prepositional phrases that have been squeezed together, so to speak, into something that looks like a single word; each is actually several words. That squeezing is an orthographic artefact. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Nov 27 '16 at 12:54
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Usually to say that the day before today was cold, one might use

It was such a cold day yesterday that we could not go out.
It was so cold yesterday, we could not go out.

to say

It was such a cold yesterday that we could not go out.

is not correct and may not be understandable since the listener may be wondering which yesterday, however, it might be possible to use

It was a cold yesterday

in a poetic sense to describe a cold day in the past. For example,

It was a cold day.

the listener would be able to imagine themself being in the fictional day, whereas

It was a cold yesterday.

the listener might only be able to imagine themself after the described day, using "yesterday" making it further in the past.

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