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So, I was on facebook today and I came across a comment that read

I had no idea you could fit in so much sad on the comment section of a facebook post.

Now, the person who commented that probably meant it in a sarcastic way.
Anyway, what I'm more curious about is whether the sentence should've been

I had no idea you could fit so much sad/sadness on the comment section of a facebook post.

In this version, the preposition in is omitted.

Should there be a preposition following the word fit in this sentence?

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    @user178049 -- On this website (ell.stackexchange.com), it is common to highlight the word or words that are being asked about. Using a bold font is one way to highlight such words. – Jasper Nov 27 '16 at 22:48
  • @user178049 -- The original poster is specifically asking about whether the word "in" should be omitted. – Jasper Nov 27 '16 at 22:51
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    @Jasper The question should be in the description rather than the title. – user178049 Nov 27 '16 at 22:54
  • to fit so many clothes in or into the suitcase or to fit in so many clothes in the suitcase. Personally, for facebook, I'd say: to put so much sadness into a post. You put sadness into writing or comments. You don't fit them into it. – Lambie Nov 27 '16 at 23:26
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    Seriously, Facebook comments are not where you want to look for style, grammar, or even coherency. – Robusto Nov 28 '16 at 1:19
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In your example, either using or not using "in" has very similar meanings for the two sentences.

However,

fit in

is used to emphasize that there is something big going into someplace small. For example

How can you be in such a small place?
how can you allow yourself to be in such a tight location

How can you fit in such a small place?
how did you manage to get into such a tight location

If the author wrote

I had no idea you could have so much sadness in a comment

they would be talking about the feeling of what was written even if it was short and a few lines, whereas

I had no idea you could fit in so much sadness in a comment

might give the impression that many things were mentioned that are sad.

  • "I had no idea you could fit so much sadness in a comment." Would this sentence be considered wrong? I mean, we say "I didn't think you'd fit be able to fit yourself in/into that box.", not "I didn't think you'd be able fit in yourself in/into that box." – lekon chekon Nov 29 '16 at 10:50
  • "I had no idea you could fit so much sadness in a comment.", "I had no idea you could fit so much activity in one day.", "I had no idea you could fit in that box." are all correct and understandable. – Peter Nov 29 '16 at 15:16
  • Since i was actually talking about various comments that had been made by several people, on the comment section of some post on facebook, would it be safe to say this "I had no idea you could fit so much sadness on the comment section of a facebook post." isn't grammatically wrong? – lekon chekon Dec 1 '16 at 16:52
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This is not only a matter of grammar, but style. The author of the Facebook post has done a couple of things to emphasize their point.

The first is to treat the descriptive statement 'sad' as noun, as if it were a physical object. Sad in this context is not equal to sadness.

The second is to use 'fit in' to strengthen the idea that a surprisingly large amount 'sad' is being squeezed into a space presumably too small for it.

It's an effective stylistic method to communicate an idea.

Unless we change the author's intent for the use of sad, the statement would be weaker without the preposition 'in' after 'fit'.

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