0

Which of following sentence is the exact usage of the verb hate:

I hate my family not understanding me

I hate my family not to understand me

  • "I hate my family for not understanding me." – Mick Nov 28 '16 at 18:53
  • 2
    Do you hate your family or the fact that your family doesn't understand you? "I hate that my family doesn't understand me." – Peter Nov 28 '16 at 19:00
  • 1
    @Mick That suggestion completely changes the meaning, though. "I hate my family not understanding me" is perfectly fine and means "I hate it when my family doesn't understand me". It means that there are times when you family don't understand you - and you hate that. But you can still think the world of your family. "I hate my family for not understanding me" means "I hate my family, and here's the reason why: They don't understand me (sometimes)" – Au101 Nov 28 '16 at 19:10
  • 1
    @Au101 You're right. I misread the question. – Mick Nov 28 '16 at 19:14
3

The problem with both of your sentences is that, when you use the verb hate, the thing that you hate follows directly after the verb. Putting my family directly after the verb (even as part of the noun clause my family not understanding me) is confusing, because we parse it incorrectly as I hate my family then we are not sure what to do with the rest of the noun clause.

You can avoid this problem by putting something other than a noun directly after the verb. Here are some better ways of framing the same statement:

I hate that my family don't understand me. - with conjunction
I hate it that my family don't understand me. - with pronoun
I hate being misunderstood by my family. - with gerund
I hate to be misunderstood by my family. - with to+infinitive

Note that the last example does not sound particularly natural, but this format is definitely likely to be used with a would...

I would hate to be misunderstood by my family.

0

There are various ways to say this:

I hate (it) when my family doesn't understand me. (they frequently don't understand me)

I hate that my family doesn't understand me. (they usually don't understand me)

Both of these say that it's the situation you hate. If instead you want to say you hate the people (when they do something).

I hate my family when they don't understand me. (they frequently don't understand me)

I hate my family for not understanding me. (they usually don't understand me)

plus other expressions.

We can form these kind of "I hate X" (where X is some kind of noun clause) sentences as follows:

My family understands me

My family doesn't understand me.

I hate that (my family doesn't understand me.)

In the same way:

Jill is on time.

Jill is not on time.

I hate when (Jill is not on time.)

Note using "that", "when", "for" (or various others) can imply different things. For example, that suggests a recurring or permanent condition, while when implies an occasional or situational condition.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.