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I am having 2 sentences and looking for a way to join them. As I am unable to find a proper clause to do this, I feel to use ; to join them.

The results are analysed based on the reference data obtained by investigating images interactively.

The investigation gives 209, 67 and 155 roof planes in each scene respectively.

I would join the sentences as follows.

The results are analysed based on the reference data obtained by investigating images interactively; 209, 67 and 155 roof planes in each scene respectively.

Can we join sentence like this, even without a verb, as shown in the last sentence?

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There are constructions that can eliminate the second verb, but that example doesn't work, and since the verb "give" does carry useful information, I'd suggest

The results are analysed based on the reference data obtained by investigating images interactively, giving (or yielding) 209, 67 and 155 roof planes in each scene respectively.

To eliminate the second verb, you'd need to rewrite the second sentence in such a way that it isn't trying to be a full clause; this might work (note colon instead of semicolon):

The results are produced from the reference data obtained by investigating images interactively: 209, 67 and 155 roof planes in each scene respectively.

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The two sentences make sense alone because one follows the other directly. If you really needed to splice them, I think you could use a ":" there (instead of a semicolon), because it's a list. (The semicolon technically might be ok, just a bit clumsily feeling.)

You could also try:

Based on the reference data obtained by investigating images interactively, we get 209, 67, and 155 roof planes in each scene respectively.

Or how about the following?

The reference data obtained by investigating images interactively yields 209, 67, and 155 roof planes in each scene [respectively].

I am not sure respectively is needed, unless it's part of the bigger context.

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Semi-colons connect two thoughts or sentences that have more resonance when conjoined than when separate sentences. Colons lead directly from something to an explication or example of what has been mentioned. Neither are simply splices.Each have a powerful impact on how the thoughts are presented.

I could not face it; he would not face it.

This connects the I and He in a way that makes you think about the differences.

I could not face it. He would not face it.

This makes islands of the two thoughts. There is a stronger separation.

You can't see the inevitable: you will die.

Connects the dying directly to the inevitable in a punchy, can't-avoid-it way.

Semi-colons are a break, but a less strong break than periods (aka full stops). Colons always lead to something; semi-colons pause and start again.

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