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Ray is the better that any other student in the class.
Ray is better than any student in the college.

When do we use ANY and ANY OTHER in a sentence comparing things, place, etc.?

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    What do "Than" and "Than that of" have to do with your question? – SovereignSun Dec 1 '16 at 9:17
  • Anyway as far as I know "any other" stand for plural while "than that of" stands for singular. "any" and "any other" are interchangeable. Ray is the better that any other student in the class. is correct and Ray is better than any student in the college. is also correct. – SovereignSun Dec 1 '16 at 9:18
  • This painting is better than that of Kate's. is correct and This painting is better than Kate's. is also correct. – SovereignSun Dec 1 '16 at 9:20
  • You can also say, "This painting is better than that Kate painted" – SovereignSun Dec 1 '16 at 9:21
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    "This painting is better than that of Kate's" is wrong because it's using two different ways to show possession at the same time. Something can be Kate's painting or it can be the painting of Kate, but you don't use both constructions in the same sentence like "the painting of Kate's". – stangdon Dec 2 '16 at 15:53

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