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What is the proper usage of the phrase from starting date "to now"?

Which of the follows is/are correct and which do you recommend when you ask your friend for their notes?

  1. Can you show me your notes from March to now.
  2. Can you show me your notes from March up to now.
  3. Can you show me your notes from March till now.
  4. Can you show me your notes from March up until now.
  5. Can you show me your notes from March to date.
  • You could also say until now. – JavaLatte Dec 2 '16 at 10:24
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The usage of "to now" is just how you have it in your examples, with "up to now", "till now", and "up until now" all being different variations with the same meaning. It is just the a time-span from a starting point, (March, in this case), up until this moment.

All of these answers are correct in various contexts. If you are going to ask a friend for their notes 1-4 are all good choices. #5 is correct, and you could certainly say it to a friend, but it is just a little more formal than the others and is often used without the starting point (e.g., 'the research to date...' meaning 'the research up until now').

  • What is the difference between to now and up to now? – English101 Dec 2 '16 at 13:40

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