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Steve Mnuchin may be the silver bullet to the vampire life-blood cash draining net worth sweep.

source:http://seekingalpha.com/article/4027602-ding-dong-net-worth-sweep-dead-yet.

Let's divide it into tow parts. Part A :Steve Mnuchin may be the silver bullet to
Part B :the vampire life-blood cash draining net worth sweep

The whole structure is : Somebody is the silver bullet to something.
silver bullet is a idiom in english,the meaning is simple to understand for me.
The something ,part B is confused me.

Can we shorten part B into a word cash sweep?
1. vampire life-blood is a grammar rule Noums as Adjective, the noun vampire and life-blood performs the function of an adjective to modify cash sweep.
2.cash draining net worth sweep can shorten as cash sweep,draining net worth , Present Participle as Adjective, performs the function of an adjective too, to modify sweep.

Is my analysis for the sentence right?

To think over the whole sententce after reading SthoneyB's explanation,can i rewrite it as below?

Steve Mnuchin may be the silver bullet to the vampire that net worth sweep drained life-blood cash.

  • No: the vampire is the net worth sweep. "SM may be the silver bullet to the vampire NWS, which drains L-BC (from FM and FC)." Your relative clause is ill-formed: that should replace the subject, but you provide the subject, NWS. – StoneyB Dec 3 '16 at 12:29
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the vampire life-blood cash draining net worth sweep

I suggest you should parse it thus:

  • the 'core' of the entire phrase is the NP net worth sweep ... this phrase occurs in the title of the article, and repeatedly in the body, and signifies

    The U.S. government’s 2012 decision to take all the profits from Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac —Bloomberg

    This NP may be paraphrased as "a sweep of net worth". It is parsed as:

    • sweep, employed as a noun, the head of the NP phrase, and
    • net worth, an attributive NP designating what the sweep sweeps. That in turn has two constituents:
      • worth, a noun, the head of the NP, and
      • net, an adjective modifying worth
  • This core nominal has two modifiers:

    • vampire, an attributive noun, and
    • life-blood cash draining, a 'gloss' on or expansion of vampire. It may be parsed as an inverted participle phrase which fronts the participle's object. It thus has two constituents:
      • draining, which describes net worth sweep, and
      • life-blood cash, which is an NP representing what the net worth sweep drains. That in turn has two constituents:
        • cash, the head of the phrase, and
        • life-blood, an attributive noun modifying cash

The entire sentence may be paraphrased

The government's sweep of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac's net worth is vampiric, draining the cash which is the life-blood of those institutions. Steve Mnuchin may be the "silver bullet" which slays that vampire.

  • To think over the whole sententce after reading SthoneyB's explanation,can i rewrite it as below? – it_is_a_literature Dec 3 '16 at 9:17
  • Steve Mnuchin may be the silver bullet to the vampire that net worth sweep drained life-blood cash. – it_is_a_literature Dec 3 '16 at 9:18

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