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There was rice enough for all four of them.

There was enough rice for all four of them.

Are these two sentences different in meaning as to the position of "enough"?

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  • Both are correct and the meaning is the same, although the first is a little old-fashioned.
    – Mick
    Commented Dec 3, 2016 at 9:40

2 Answers 2

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When used before the noun that it qualifies, enough is a determiner, like some:

There was enough rice for all four of them.
There was some rice for all four of them.

When used after what it qualifies, enough is an adverb of degree. As an adverb, it is normally used to qualify another adverb or an adjective:

You are not running quickly enough. - adverb
The house was big enough for all four of them. - adjective

In modern usage it is normally only used to qualify a noun if you are using the noun in an adjectival sense:

He is man enough for the job.

In your first sentence, rice is not used in an adjectival sense, so placing enough after it sounds somewhat old-fashioned:

There was rice enough for all four of them.

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There's rice enough........

There's enough rice........

The usage of the determiner "enough" after a noun is old-fashioned.

Today, you use the "enough" in front of a noun, not after it. So you say:

There's enough rice......., not there's rice enough......

However, you use the enough as an adverb to modify an adjective or a verb.

The qunantity of the rice was large enough ..

He has eaten enough.

There's a common phrase "be man enough to do/for something".

In the phrase man has been used in the sense of "brave".

He was man enough to admit his mistake = He was brave enough to admit his mistake.

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    Thank you for your contribution. However, you should edit your question to provide explanation and improve formatting. An answer with little or no explanation isn't great at helping someone learn the language.
    – LMS
    Commented Dec 3, 2016 at 13:17
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    A man is an adult male person as opposed to a teenager, so my take is that it is this that makes adult enough a person man enough to admit his mistake, not his braveness. IMHO
    – Victor B.
    Commented Dec 3, 2016 at 14:09
  • macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/british/…
    – Khan
    Commented Dec 5, 2016 at 5:10
  • dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/…
    – Khan
    Commented Dec 5, 2016 at 5:11

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