1

What types of verb should follow "convenience" in the following example?

It's for the convenience of those people who love hockey to play

It's for the convenience of those people who love hockey playing

Which one would be correct? Or if they're both acceptable, what is the actual difference behind them?

7
  • 1
    Neither of the sentences make sense. What are you actually trying to say?
    – Catija
    Nov 23, 2016 at 3:40
  • Sorry, I mis-spelled the word "convenience". I edited it. @Catija
    – Edward
    Nov 23, 2016 at 3:44
  • I still don't understand how efficient playing makes it more convenient. Grammatically, "to play" is the correct option but the sentence doesn't mean anything.
    – Catija
    Nov 23, 2016 at 3:55
  • 1
    people who love hockey, not people who loves hockey
    – John Feltz
    Nov 23, 2016 at 3:56
  • "Convenience" is a noun, and pretty much any verb can follow it.
    – Hot Licks
    Nov 23, 2016 at 4:02

2 Answers 2

2

The correct wording is:

It's for the convenience of those people who love to play hockey

Presumably "it" refers to something hockey players can buy/do to make their lives easier?

0

I would add another possible variant to D.Nelson's answer.

  • It's for the convenience of those people who love playing hockey.

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