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What would be the explanation for using "to" after "wants" in this sentence and overall?

If you want to send a message without anybody being able to listen in on it, there are two basic ways of doing this:

  1. have a secure channel
  2. send the message on the open air, but disguise it

We’ll consider the second approach to this, so we’ll assume that anybody who wants to can see the message.

  • /Send a message over a secure channel or Broadcast it over the air./ – Lambie Dec 7 '16 at 20:56
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Non repetition of main idea:

If you have a main idea, you do not need to repeat it after certain verbs of volition + to that would re-express the main idea:

Anyone who wants to [play tennis] may play with us this afternoon.

[...]so we’ll assume that anybody who wants to [see the message] can see the message.

Want to, like to, would like to, would hate to, would prefer to Simpler examples to help them stick in your mind:

I'm going to the movies at five. Do you want to [go to the movies at five]?

She's swims 10 miles every day. I'd hate to [swim ten miles every day].

They'd love to come for lunch on Saturday. I'd love to [come for lunch on Saturday] too.

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It's a parallel construction. It means:

... anybody who wants to see the message can see the message.

The form is "want to (verb)"

I want to eat breakfast.

She wants to watch television.

You could rewrite what you quoted as follows, and not force the reader to backtrack:

... anybody who wants to see the message can.

Or you could write it verbosely.

... anybody who wants to see the message can see the message.

... anybody who wants to see the message can see it.

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