0

Should I use is or are in this sentence?

Vocabulary-based games is something that he enjoys the most.

closed as off-topic by Catija, Nathan Tuggy, Varun Nair, Em., user3169 Dec 13 '16 at 6:41

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question should include more details than have been provided here. Please edit to add the research you have done in your efforts to answer the question, or provide more context. See: Details, Please." – Catija, Nathan Tuggy, Varun Nair, Em., user3169
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 1
    What verb would you normally use with a plural noun? Why do you think this one is different? – Catija Dec 13 '16 at 1:00
  • @Catija - "What verb would you normally use with a plural noun?" - Sometimes "are", sometimes "is" ("His statistics is wrong", "That crossroads is far away from here", etc). "Why do you think this one is different?" Different from what? – brilliant Dec 13 '16 at 1:03
  • You don't use "is" with plural nouns. – Catija Dec 13 '16 at 1:04
  • @Catija - Check my examples in the comment above. – brilliant Dec 13 '16 at 1:05
  • 1
    Stop looking at the odd exceptions and look at the actual example here. Does the definition for "games" ever allow for it to be singular? Even if you're looking at your crossroads example, the word "that" implies that it must be singular, so the "is" is obvious. – Catija Dec 13 '16 at 1:10
3

Vocabulary-based games are things that he enjoys the most.

Vocabulary-based games is clearly plural. Please use the plural copular(are). For words like "crossroads", that's just how the word is, it's plural in form but it can be singular or plural in use. Thus, the singular and plural form for crossroads is crossroads.

  • "Vocabulary-based games is clearly plural" - Why did you use is in this sentence? – brilliant Dec 13 '16 at 2:04
  • @brilliant Singular or plural the word depends on what you want it to mean. In this context, I take "vocabulary-based games" as a phrase not literally the game. – user178049 Dec 13 '16 at 2:07
  • So, would it be correct to say "is" then in this case: "There are many different methods that you can use to direct his energy into the course of studying. We usually use five methods: songs, skits, quizzes, vocabulary-based games, and discussions. Vocabulary-based games is something that he enjoys the most"? – brilliant Dec 13 '16 at 2:19
  • @brilliant Yes, if you consider "vocabulary-based games" as one of the methods. – user178049 Dec 13 '16 at 2:23

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.