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I wrote:

Some people have a better performance when there are some colleagues around.

Does it need a final "them" as:

Some people have a better performance when there are some colleagues around them.

If yes, why?

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    "around (them)". The pronoun imparts a difference meaning to the phrase. And "perform better" would be simpler than "have a better performance". Dec 13 '16 at 11:43
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She liked to have family around her.

She liked to have family around.

"Around her" would mean "to be surrounded by family". They are in her immediate presence. She is in their midst.

"Around" would mean that members of the family were in her general vicinity, in the house, or in the neighborhood, say, or just in the same town; not in her immediate presence.

She was reluctant to take a weekend trip without someone around to stop in and check on her cat.

The minute the actress entered the hall, there were photographers and reporters around her.

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