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The power as commander is given to the president.

I am not so sure if I can use "as" as the adjectival preposition as in this sentence?
Is it grammatical?

  • Moderators of this community now are trying to reduce the use of the "grammar" tag, you should use a more specific tag like "noun" or 'adjective" – user178049 Dec 15 '16 at 6:29
  • No. You can't use this preposition in this context, however, note this: "The power goes to the commander as the general can lead the armies no longer." – SovereignSun Dec 15 '16 at 9:01
  • I think what you mean might be "The power is given to the president as commander" - that is, the power is given to the president because of his role as commander. Alternately, maybe you mean "The power of being commander is given to the president." – stangdon Dec 15 '16 at 15:27
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The power as commander is given to the president.

This sounds like commander is describing the subject if the sentence were not passive, instead of describing the type of power. I think it's technically grammatical but sounds confusing and odd.

The power as commander is given to the president = Someone, acting as commander, gave power to the president.

If you want to say commander as in "kind of power", use of or just use commander as an adjective:

The power of commander is given to the president.

The commander power is given to the president.

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