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Imagine a mother who notices that her son has had a problem with one of his classmates who the mother knows him / her well. She wants to discover if they are on good terms / are friends yet or they have broken up. Which one of the prepositions below in the self-made sentences of mine doesn't sounds natural to you:

  • Are you two still on good terms / friends to each other?
  • Are you two still on good terms / friends with each other?
  • Are you two still on good terms / friends together?
  • Are you two still on good terms / friends with one another?

For me, they all work, but I doubt if native speakers think so.

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The full idiomatic expression is (to be) on good terms (with somebody), therefore the first and third expressions don't work particularly well. A similar argument can be made for friends - one can 'be a good friend to somebody', but one 'is friends with somebody'.

Are you two still on good terms / friends with each other?

Are you two still on good terms / friends with one another?

Both are acceptable. Or the 'with each another/with one another' can be omitted entirely, if it is implicit in the conversation who the other person is. For example:

A: Have you seen John recently?

B: Yes, I saw him yesterday.

A: Are you still on good terms?

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  • I'd add that the with one another version sounds more formal than with each other. I doubt I'd use the former in conversation.
    – J.R.
    Commented Dec 15, 2016 at 15:20

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