1

I wrote:

Let’s call this pattern P. If P has a parent pattern that has not been visited yet, nothing is performed and the algorithms returns and continues with the rest of nodes.

Which of the following alternatives is better than the above:

Let’s call this pattern P. If P has a parent pattern that has not yet been visited, nothing is performed and the algorithms returns and continues with the rest of nodes.

Let’s call this pattern P. If P has a parent pattern that still has not been visited, nothing is performed and the algorithms returns and continues with the rest of nodes.

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    I wouldn't use either, i.e., I'd write If P has a parent pattern that has not been visited, ... or maybe If P has an unvisited parent pattern, ... – Damkerng T. Dec 17 '16 at 8:25
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The answer depends on what you want to convey in the sentence.

When you say that someone or something has not yet been visited, you are saying that although the visit has not occurred, it will sometime in the future.

If you refer to someone or something that still has not been visited, you will be indicating that some time has passed and it still has not occurred. Saying this does not indicate either way whether the visit will happen or not, so there possibly could be the question in the mind of the person saying this, of whether it will happen or not.

So if you are wanting to say it hasn't yet been visited, but will be visited in the future, as indicated above, I would use alternative sentence #1, because using #2 does not indicate a possibility that it will be visited.

If you cannot be sure that it will be visited I would use alternative sentence #2, because using #1 would indicate it will be visited.

  • I want to say it hasn't been yet visited, but will be visited in the rest of algorithm. Is there any difference between #1 and #2 regarding the place of "yet"? – Ahmad Dec 17 '16 at 9:10
  • @Ahmad I have expanded my answer to cover your question in your comment – Chris Rogers Dec 17 '16 at 9:22
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If you mean to say that at some point the algorithm "will" (with certainty) be going to the parent node, neither construction makes that clear. That is to say using either yet or still does not convey the information. If it is clear in a previous sentence, then yet is the better choice cause it conforms more to the idea of repeating something until x occurs.

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