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I wonder which of the following sentences are grammatically correct? Is there is a technical term for this kind of structure.

On watching the news, I immediately called him.

As soon as watching the news, I immediately called him.

The moment watching the news, I immediately called him.


This question is from a test. For me the first two sound okay but I cannot explain if one them is wrong.

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  • Is this from a test? What is your own guess regarding this? Dec 17 '16 at 19:58
  • @CowperKettle Yes .This question is from a test. For me the first two sound okay but I cannot explain if one them is wrong.
    – Mrt
    Dec 17 '16 at 20:01
  • I can't really explain what a non-finite clause is, but I can say that as soon as or the moment (that) require a complete clause after them, and that means a subject and a verb. "watching the news" doesn't have a subject doing a verb, so it doesn't work with those two.
    – stangdon
    Dec 18 '16 at 0:05
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As soon as watching the news, I immediately called him.

This sentence is incorrect grammatically. Why? Because the expression as soon as cannot take a non-finite clause ("watching the news").

It can take a finite clause:

As soon as I watched the news, I immediately called him.

Furthermore, "as soon as" is synonymous with "immediately after" so you might have felt some oddnes of the whole sentence.

Immediately after watching the news I immediately called him.

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  • Thank you. I know what non-finite clause means but do you have a link for a resource that explains " as soon as cannot take a non-finite clause"
    – Mrt
    Dec 17 '16 at 20:15

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