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I'm struggling with these questions. What's the difference between them?

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    How do I convince you there's no significant difference? Can I convince you? Do I convince you? Dec 18, 2016 at 18:15
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    'Can I' literally means "Am I able to". So if you want to be grammatically correct, do not use can. "Can I do this?" Means: "Am I able to do this?" "Can I get to the station from here?" Means: "Am I able to get there from here?" However, in real, everyday English -- it's the same and there is no difference.
    – WRX
    Dec 18, 2016 at 19:20

2 Answers 2

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The two expressions are essentially equivalent. The nuance might be that "do" may be interpreted as asking for specific step in doing an action, whereas "can" may be interpreted as asking how to do something (ability)

How do I get to the library?

Go down to the corner. Turn right. Walk a half mile and it will be on your left.

whereas

How can I get to the library?

You can either walk, drive, or take the bus, the library is very accessible.

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In casual conversation, when dealing with directions and travel, they are equivalent.

Without anything else, they have an implied meaning of "from here". Otherwise, you should specify "from ..."

How can I get to the library?

How do I get to the library?

How can I get to your office from the train station?

How can I get from the train station to your office?

How do I get to the museum from here?

How do I get from here to the museum?

If you are talking about something other than directions, they are also equivalent.

How can I get my passport renewed?

How do I get my passport renewed?

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