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After the sentence 'all the animals ... San Diego Zoo,' I wanted to place a sentence with essentially the same meaning/connotation.

There was a big explosion heard in Southern California.

I hear all the animals have become extremely restless at the San Diego Zoo.

None of the animals that are kept at the zoo have been calmer since the explosion.

I wondered if I successfully repeated the same meaning/connotation in a different sentence?

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Yes, you have although the second sentence is not quite idiomatic. This would be better:

None of the animals that are kept at the zoo have calmed down since the explosion.

To "calm down" is the most direct opposite to "become restless". Otherwise you correctly used "none of the ..." instead of "all of the .."

You can also omit "that are" from this sentence, once you get familiar with the gammar:

None of the animals kept at the zoo have calmed down since the explosion.

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  • Andrew, thanks. However, the subtlety I wanted the second sentence to carry is each and every animal at the zoo has become 'extremely' restless. Could you produce a sentence that starts with 'None of the animals ...' which means to the same effect? – Sssamy Dec 20 '16 at 14:36
  • @Sssamy it depends on what you mean by "extremely restless". Do you mean they panicked or stampeded -- both of which imply that they tried to escape their enclosures and perhaps had to be sedated or tranquilized. Otherwise "calm down" is an appropriate opposite to simple agitation. – Andrew Dec 20 '16 at 14:51

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