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One wrote

I've heard about this thing this morning and I don't know anything more than a Polish trucker is said to be killed in Germany.

I changed it into

I've heard about this thing this morning and I don't know anything more than this that a Polish trucker is said to have been killed in Germany.

Is this that required?

What is the grammar for "said to have been killed"? Is it different from the original phrase?

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    Both this and that are (independently) optional. If you're going to include this you'll need to follow it with a detectable pause regardless of whether you include that or not, but if you don't include it there's no reason to pause anywhere after ...and I don't know. And it must always be said to have been killed - your first version is never idiomatic. – FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica Dec 21 '16 at 19:06
  • It is said to be an acquired taste. It is said to have been thought the nectar of the gods. The tense depends on the context. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Dec 21 '16 at 20:49
  • They are also jointly optional. ...I don't know anything more than a trucker is said to have been killed... ... I don't know anything more than (what) he told me... I don't know anything more than I was told. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Dec 21 '16 at 20:52
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"Said to have been killed" is correct in this context, but if you use "this that" there should be some punctuation after "this", either a long dash or a colon.

I don't know anything more than this -- that a Polish trucker ...

I don't know anything more than this: that a Polish trucker ...

Also the "that" is not necessary:

I don't know anything more than this: a Polish trucker is said to have been killed in Germany.

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    Alternately, I think a more natural phrasing would be to leave out this entirely: "I don't know anything more than that a Polish trucker..." – stangdon Dec 21 '16 at 18:31
  • @stangdon This followed by a long dash is dramatic, and some people -- myself included -- tend to write this way (even if we shouldn't). I agree it's less common but I wouldn't say it's less natural. – Andrew Dec 21 '16 at 18:34
  • Well, maybe natural was a bit strong, but I think phrasings like "than this -- that a..." are rather explicitly dramatic. In common speech, I think people are more likely to say "than that a", no? – stangdon Dec 21 '16 at 18:36
  • Sure, especially in this context. – Andrew Dec 21 '16 at 18:41
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    @confusedguy "killed" represents an event, not a condition. It happened in the past so you can't use the present tense infinitive. You could say, "He is said to be dead" because that is a current condition. – Andrew Jul 16 at 15:34

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