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no native speaker here and I am not entirely sure which one is correct.

This is what I am suppose to write:

IMPORTANT NOTE: The recommended minimum retention time of 60 minutes after check-in is reached on 16:30.

This is how I would write it:

IMPORTANT NOTE: The recommended minimum retention time of 60 minutes after check-in will be reached at 16:30.

Any suggestions? I am also thinking of using "will be passed" here.

NOTE: This text is shown when the time has not passed yet and "16:30" will be in the future i.e. 10 minutes away from now.

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  • What is meant by "minimum retention time"? – Andrew Dec 21 '16 at 19:23
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Your wording is correct. The first sentence is wrong for two reasons.

First, the preposition should be at rather than on. When describing an event that occurred, occurs, or will occur at a specific time, at is used and not on:

She left the office at 6:30.
The train to London leaves at 12:17.
I will pick you up at 8 pm.

Second, since the situation here involves something that will happen in the future, the correct tense is future. Suppose it's 9:25, I'm on a bus, and my friend who's waiting for me texts me to ask where I am. I can say:

I'm on my way. I will be there in ten minutes.

Or I can say:

I'm on my way. I will be there at 9:35.

In both cases, the future is correct.

So the way you have phrased the sentence is absolutely correct. You are right to mistrust the original.

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The most important thing here is the preference for at instead of on. Also, in the US outside of the military or academia, 16:30 is stated as 4:30 p.m. with the p.m. left out of the spoken version when it can be implied. My shift is over at 7:00 but I take my break at 4:30. In writing add p.m. while in speech use if the user doesn't know whether you work days or nights. Navy Seals get out of bed at 4:30. In writing be correct, in speech it's understood.

Will be reached sounds better as in "the clock chimes every hour. If you set the alarm, it will chime at the set time."

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