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We can say 'Do be careful', 'do be straightforward about it'.

And we can say ' There do exist...', such as:

----- From a synchronic point of view, there do exist cases of regular abrupt metathesis, ...

----- However, there do exist many situations where onsite capacity is the most viable option...

So I wonder if I can accordingly say sentences like'There DID BE such a teacher then in my school'?

Is it right(and why)? Have you ever seen such expressions? Thank you very much.

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Short answer: No, it's not right.

Long answer: There DID not be such a sentence, then, in modern English.

Note that all your "Do be..." sentences are the imperative "do". That is, they're commands.

However, the "do" in "there do exist..." is there to emphasize the contrast from previous sentences.

So, there DID exist such a sentence, then, in modern English, but there did not be such a sentence, then, in modern English.

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  • Thank you very. So I finally get to know that the sentence THERE DID NOT BE SUCH A SENTENCE IN MODERN ENGLISH is right; and therefore THERE DO BE SUCH A SENTENCE IN MODERN ENGLISH is also right, is it? @Teacher KSHuang – yhemusa Dec 26 '16 at 8:36
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    I have not been able to add a comment here since I saw the answer. I can do it only from today. – yhemusa Dec 26 '16 at 8:51
  • @yhemusa Heh, no, both those sentences are wrong. Read the last sentence of my answer again: So, there DID exist such a sentence, then, in modern English (correct), but there did not be such a sentence, then, in modern English (incorrect). – Teacher KSHuang Dec 30 '16 at 8:41

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