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I wrote this sentence:

In conclusion, the reading claims that minimum wage is harmful to the companies, which the lecturer contradicts by providing three points –which form a compelling argument, to illustrate his viewpoint.

I don't know if it is grammatically correct to use - before which and I don't know if I should replace the , with -.

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First, it should be an em dash, not a hyphen. (If you cannot produce an em dash, a double hyphen is generally considered an acceptable substitute.) Second, you must use the em dash on both sides of the clause it offsets.

In conclusion, the reading claims that minimum wage is harmful to the companies, which the lecturer contradicts by providing three points—which form a compelling argument—to illustrate his viewpoint.

  • would it be better if i said In conclusion, the reading claims that minimum wage is harmful to the companies, contradicted by the lecturer in three points, which together form a compelling argument illustrating his view ? – Marco Dinatsoli Oct 15 '13 at 13:47
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    Both sides—**unless** it is the first or last clause which is to be demarcated – StoneyB Oct 15 '13 at 13:49
  • @StoneyB what do you mean please ? this is the conclusion of my essay, nothing after it will be written. – Marco Dinatsoli Oct 16 '13 at 17:18
  • @MarcoDinatsoli, he's referring to the case when you write something like "which the lecturer contradicts by providing three points--which form a compelling argument." Since the clause that starts out with the '--' is the last clause in the sentence, you don't put another '--' at the end of the clause; instead you use the period to end the entire sentence. – Hellion Oct 16 '13 at 17:32

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