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Yesterday I called my doctor but could not get his appointment. Hence Today I again tried for his appointment.
I started our conversation with receptionist as follows.

Yesterday, I had called for an appointment but could not get doctor’s appointment, can you book my appointment for Today at 7 pm."

Is my conversation is correct Or Should I simply use simple past tense as below?

Yesterday, I called for an appointment but could not get doctor’s appointment. Can you book my appointment for Today at 7 pm?

I know simple past is perfect here but can I use Past perfect tense to give emphasis on my first action i.e. called for an appointment.

I mean

Yesterday I called receptionist first. And after that I give up because receptionist refused my appointment after checking his appointment diary and then I choose to wait for tomorrow’s appointment.

  • The past perfect doesn't fit here. You use the past simple. – Khan Dec 27 '16 at 14:13
  • @Khan I think we can use past perfect to refer the first action happened before the second action as op has mentioned. But the word 'yesterday' fits better with simple past. – yubraj Dec 27 '16 at 14:28
  • @yubrajsharma, Two actions happened right one after another (in sequence). The use of the past perfect is unnecessary. – Khan Dec 27 '16 at 15:10
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    Possible duplicate of When is the past perfect exactly needed? – Let's stop villifying Iran Nov 24 '17 at 4:36
  • @Khan: Just because it's unnecessary doesn't mean it's wrong. I think it's grammatical, although simple past is better. – Peter Shor Nov 24 '17 at 12:22
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Just a simple explanation:

When you use past perfect listners or readers expect more information is going to come.

If you wanna say what happened in the past use the simple past, but if you wanna say what happened or what was happening before another thing happened use past perfect.

In other word use past perfect when you want to say what had happened up to a point in the past (or before a certain time in the past).

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I think we can use past perfect to give emphasis on the first action as you mentioned. While using 'past perfect' in a sentence, we normally use 'simple past' to refer to second action which happenes after the first action. But we normally use simple past with time words such as 'yesterday'. I would say both simple past and past perfect are grammatically correct to use in this kind of situation. But 'simple past' is more common and idiomatic.

The first version

Yesterday, I had called for an appointment but could not get doctor’s appointment, can you book my appointment for Today at 7 pm."

This sentence emphasizes on the first action i.e. I called for an appointment." But It doesn't mean that simple past doesn't emphasis to the first action.

The second version

Yesterday, I called for an appointment but could not get doctor’s appointment. Can you book my appointment for Today at 7 pm?

In this sentence,the word 'yesterday' clearly shows that both the actions' I called for an appointment' and 'couldn't get doctor's appointment' happened in past i.e. in yesterday. Both the actions happened in the past and It's self understood (Implied) that the first action is 'I called for an appointment.'

On the other hand, as @khan mentioned in his comment, both the action happened in sequence (one after another). So, we don't normally need to use 'past perfect' to give emphasis to the first action.

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