1

I am confused at the usage of (comparatively+than). Please guide.

9
  • The adverb "comparatively" can be used to modify both "cheap" and "cheaper", but only the comparative form "cheaper" can be used in comparative constructions like this one. The reason is that the -er suffix is effectively in construction with the preposition "than". What follows "than" may be analysed as a direct complement of "than" or as a reduced comparative clause with "that one" as subject.
    – BillJ
    Dec 27, 2016 at 19:38
  • I've updated the answer to include the sentence: "This book is cheaper than that one."
    – GetzelR
    Dec 27, 2016 at 19:42
  • I don't think than is part of any preposition.
    – Abbasi
    Dec 27, 2016 at 20:38
  • 1
    Briefly speaking, you need to use the comparative form of adjectives when you are about to compare something/someone with another. E.g., he is taller than her. this car is bigger than yours. That flower is more beautiful than this one.
    – Abbasi
    Dec 27, 2016 at 20:49
  • @Abbasi Of course "than" is a preposition: link. It heads the PP "than that one", where the noun phrase "that one" is object of "than". Read my first message for how the grammar works here.
    – BillJ
    Dec 28, 2016 at 9:17

2 Answers 2

1

The sentence

This book is comparatively cheaper than that one.

is the correct sentence and can also be expressed as

This book is cheaper than that one.
This book is more cheap than that one.
This book is comparatively cheap compared to that one.

1

The word "comparatively" is actually unnecessary in that usage. X is bigger/smaller/cheaper/etc than Y is a comparison, and uses "than." Adding the word "comparatively" doesn't add anything at all. You can simply say "This book is cheaper than that one"

If "that one" is already under discussion, you can even say "This book is cheaper" and it will be understood to be a comparison with the book currently being discussed.

4
  • 1
    "Comparative" is what the "-er" form of some adjectives is collectively called: Comparative (better) Superlative (best). It's how some students are introduced to these in their English class. So Minaam is asking how to use a comparative with "than" in a sentence.
    – Andrew
    Dec 27, 2016 at 19:03
  • @Andrew: I agree with you and think what they need is a lesson on using that form of adjectives in sentences. To which, of course, it should be added that some adjectives don't have such forms and we need another means (more/less) to construct these sentences.
    – Abbasi
    Dec 27, 2016 at 20:44
  • @Abbasi I was hoping that GetzelR would edit his answer, given this additional information.
    – Andrew
    Dec 27, 2016 at 21:04
  • @Andrew I didn't think it necessary to copy/paste your comparative/superlative overview. I don't believe you should use "comparatively" and "than" in the same sentence. There is no sense to "than" other than comparatively.
    – GetzelR
    Dec 27, 2016 at 21:13

You must log in to answer this question.