1

I asked a related question, which its answer's comments say I can use different tense after "Until", I thought of posting the question in a separate question to get a complete answer.

Which of the following are possible or more natural

  • I waited until he left the room, then I entered there
  • I waited until he leaves the room, then I entered there
  • I waited until he had left the room, then I entered there

I know it could also be the following, but I didn't find a better example with "until". If you know use that.

  • I waited for him to leave the room

What about present:

  • I am waiting until he comes back
  • I am waiting until he will come back
  • I wait until he comes back

Or

  • I can't help you until I finish/have finished my work
  • The tense of the verb after until is governed but the verb before until. – Peter Dec 29 '16 at 7:17
  • @Peter but still there are several options. – Ahmad Dec 29 '16 at 8:55
  • None of the sentences has an ending punctuation. They can reasonably be considered incorrect (grammatically). And in the case of your question, I prefer #1 from the first three and #1 and #3 in the second three. – Abbasi Dec 29 '16 at 13:36
  • Note that I waited for him to leave the room and I waited until he left to enter the room are not the same thing. – Damkerng T. Dec 29 '16 at 15:18
4

Ahmad, it follows the same rules as the past question. All tenses mentioned can be used in that sentence. However, as it's a past tense and you are telling a past history, using "had" would make it sound more fluent.

I waited until he had left the room, then I entered there.

Now talking about your second question.

I am waiting until he comes back - Right

I am waiting until he will come back - Wrong

I wait until he comes back - Right

Remember, "until" cannot be used followed by the future tense, all the others alternatives are suitable for until, past tense, past continuous, present tense, present continuous, present perfect..

And I waited for him to leave the room also works and sounds good too, and functions with others tenses too:

I was waiting for him to leave the room

I will be waiting for him to leave the room;

I waited for him to leave the room

I have been waiting for him to leave the room.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.